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While not directly testing against the COVID-19 virus, researchers at the Penn State College of Medicine looked at a number of products and their effectiveness against coronaviruses which are similar to COVID-19. Among the products in the study were antiseptic rinses and mouthwashes.
Even though dental practices have been reopened for some time, many people are still concerned about whether or not it is safe to visit their dentist’s office. We’ve established that your oral health is more important than ever, given the ties between COVID complications and gum health, so you absolutely should see your dentist.
Dentists have long known about how your oral health is tied into the health of your entire body. In the paper by Victoria Sampson, she looks into the ways that many of COVID-19's serious complications may be related to oral bacteria.
Did you know that about 42% of Americans don't see a dentist as often as they should? Regular visits to the dentist are key to prevent dental disease, cavities, and other oral issues.
Though reassuring, it can feel like a waste of time and money to schedule a visit to the dentist only to be told that there’s nothing wrong with our teeth. At the same time, if they are ignored, certain symptoms could worsen and cause irreversible damage. So, how do you know whether or not to schedule an appointment?
Regardless of what’s causing it, chronic dry mouth can result in increased odds of developing tooth decay, demineralization of teeth, oral infections, and tooth sensitivity. It can also make it difficult for one to taste, chew, swallow, and/or speak.
There are many reasons to stop biting your nails. It’s unsanitary, visually displeasing, and it makes your nails jagged and sharp. For some people, these reasons aren’t enough to kick the habit. If you’re one of those people, here’s another symptom you may want to consider: nail-biting can cause serious damage to your teeth.
The best way to fight cavities is to brush and floss regularly, but sometimes it can be tough to clean the entire surface of your teeth. This is especially true in the case of our molars, which reside in the deep depths of the mouth and act as a haven for bacteria and leftover food.
If you’re like most of us, your teeth aren’t perfectly white. In fact, years of ingesting coffee, sugar, tobacco, or any other teeth-staining substances may have yellowed or even browned your teeth. Thankfully, dentistry has evolved to a point where we no longer have to feel ashamed of our smile.
When 92 percent of adults have had at least one cavity in their life, you know tooth decay is a real issue. But thankfully, we have something to help protect us. And it's as simple as a little paint job!
How do I know if I need a night guard? If I do need one, what kind should I get? What are the differences between ones from the drug store and the one I would get from my dentist?
Electric toothbrushes are popular and come in a variety of styles. Some use vibration while others use rotation-oscillation. They also vary in speed, with some allegedly achieving an ultrasonic speed of 192,000,000 movements per minute!
Body modifications such as tattoos and piercings seem to be popular forms of self-expression, but, given how important oral health is to overall health, are there any dangers someone thinking about getting an oral piercing should consider?
While they all say they fight cavities, some claim a variety of other benefits. We’ve seen toothpaste specially formulated for tartar, gingivitis, enamel health, tooth repair, sensitivity, whitening and fresh breath. Some come with extra ingredients like baking soda and peroxide, while others are fluoride and gluten free.