Gum Disease

A study done by the Federal University of Santa Maria Dental School in Brazil found that women with periodontitis (gum disease) are 2-3x more likely to develop breast cancer.
Can gum disease kill you? In combination with COVID-19, you have a higher risk of death if you find yourself hospitalized with COVID-19.
Have you wondered what causes teeth to change position as we age, whether or not it's a problem, and what can be done about it? We posed these questions to dentists to hear what they had to say. Here's what they told us.
Though reassuring, it can feel like a waste of time and money to schedule a visit to the dentist only to be told that there’s nothing wrong with our teeth. At the same time, if they are ignored, certain symptoms could worsen and cause irreversible damage. So, how do you know whether or not to schedule an appointment?
Wisdom teeth are the molars (located both up and down and on either side) in the very back of your mouth. In many cases they can grow improperly (i.e. at wrong angles), causing various problems in the mouth.
85 percent of people have to get their wisdom teeth removed at some point in their life. Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are unnecessary teeth that grow in when someone is around 20 years of age. And in most cases, wisdom teeth just lead to health problems.
One of the most common issues is gum disease. It's thought that eight out of ten U.S. adults suffer from mild to severe gum disease. If your gum disease progresses to the point where you need gum surgery, you probably have a lot of questions. We’ve got answers–keep reading to find out everything you need to know.